Activity: Playing the Past (Girl Scouts Premier Partner Program)

 

We have set the scene for you to recreate life at Tudor Place in 1911! Download the activity here.

Junior Girl Scouts will be able to complete all activities needed for the Playing the Past badge.

  • Read about people who lived over 100 years ago.
  • Choose a character you want to recreate in a play set in 1911.
  • Create a costume to represent the important pieces of your character.
  • Build a set and props to bring your reenactment to life.
  • Play the role in a movie scene, give a speech, write a diary entry, or play 20 questions.

Time: Up to 3 hours

Materials: Worksheet, household props, historical research databases like Chronicling America (optional)

Find more Scout Programs here.

Activity: Plant Yoga

Finding it hard to stay active? At Tudor Place, one of our favorite activities is plant yoga! Plant yoga is a quick and easy activity for people of all ages to practice balance and movement in your home or yard. You can do it for 5 minutes or you can do it for 30 minutes–whatever works for you! Always seek the advice of your physician or qualified health professional before starting or changing any exercise program.

How to do plant yoga:

  1. Put on comfortable clothes you can move around in. Find an open space where you can stretch in all directions.
  2. Find a plant (or two! or three!) to mimic.
  3. Pose and move around like your chosen plant. Droop like a weeping willow! Plant your feet like roots in the ground!  (More examples in the photos below).
  4. That’s it! Share what you’re up to with us on Instagram and Facebook and tag us #tudorplace, or email us at education@tudorplace.org

Who: Everyone

How Long: 5-30 minutes

Where: Indoors or outdoors

Our staff and their children had a blast doing plant yoga!

Download and share the Plant Yoga Activity.

Questions? Comments? Photos to share? Email us with your Education at Home needs: education@tudorplace.org

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Activity: Tudor Place Coloring Pages

Coloring is one of the great joys in life for young and old. While we cannot paint the exterior of Tudor Place a nice Cape Cod blue nor can we paint the columns on the Temple Portico to look like they are made of marble, we can color these printable Tudor Place coloring pages however our hearts desire! There is no historical accuracy in coloring.

Use these coloring pages to decorate Tudor Place as you would if you lived here. Maybe your Tudor Place will be covered in flowers to celebrate Spring? Or perhaps your Tudor Place is located underwater and there are fish everywhere. The only limit is your imagination!

We’d love to see your finished Tudor Place drawings! Share with us on Instagram or Facebook #tudorplace.

Temple Portico Coloring Page

South Lawn Coloring Page

Pierce-Arrow Coloring Page

Questions? Comments? Photos to share? Email us with your Education at Home needs: education@tudorplace.org

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Lesson: What Trees Can Tell Us

Trees gain one ring per year, like candles on a birthday cake. In this activity, students use tree rings to tell the story of a tree and its environment. Download the lesson plan and answer key here. Fit for elementary education.

 

Subjects: Plant science, natural science, simply math, historic preservation
Materials: Worksheet, glossary, and answer key (download) & pencil
Time: 25 minutes
Abilities:
5th grade reading level; basic counting and math; making comparison statements

 

Introduction:

Dendrochronology is the science of using tree rings to learn about the age and history of a piece of wood. Say the word out loud:

“ den-dro-chron-ol-o-gy ”


Dendrochronology is not only used for trees. Dendrochronology helps people learn about wooden buildings. Tree rings can also tell historians about the climate from long ago.

At Tudor Place, scientists took samples of wood from parts of the old house. The scientists used dendrochronology to learn what year the wood was cut down from a tree. They can’t know exactly, but they can make a good guess. The scientists discovered that parts of the building were older than we had thought. We can learn history through trees!

Learn how to read tree rings. Then find out what trees can tell us!

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Craft: At Home Reproduction Object Exhibit

Watch the Education team reproduce Major George Peter’s 19th-century steel pocket watch, from the Tudor Place Collection & Archive, with recycled materials found at home.

20 Minute Craft:
Pretend you are working at a museum. Your historic object, or “artifact,” is too fragile to put in your exhibit. You will have to make a copy!

Look at your object. What materials do you see? What colors do you see? Use recycled materials to craft a reproduction of your object. Now it is ready to go on display!

Materials:
– Glue, tape, scissors, markers
– Decorations of your choice
– Recycled materials
– Object you want to recreate (we chose a watch from our collection catalog)

Talk Together:
Why would a museum create a copy, or “reproduction,” of an object instead of putting the real one on display? Sunlight can harm objects, like paper. Sometimes an object is too fragile to display for extended periods. Occasionally, a reproduction object is made to complete a matching set.

Craft as many reproductions as you’d like to complete your At Home Reproduction Object Exhibit!

Go further! Learn about Collections Management:
At Tudor Place there is a person in charge of keeping all the historic objects safe. This person is called a “collections manager.” The collections manager decides if an object can go on display in an exhibit, or if the museum should make a reproduction. Collections managers do lots of other types of work, too. Learn more here:

“A Day in the Life of a Collections Manager” (Museums Association, 4 minute video)

Make a mount for an object in storage (British Columbia Museums Association, 5 minute video)

Make a custom box for a teapot (Mount Heritage Center, 12 minute video)

 

Questions? Comments? Photos to share? Email us with your Education at Home needs: education@tudorplace.org

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