Honoring the enslaved people who resisted bondage in ways large and small: Juneteenth 2021

Photo: Tudor Place Archive, A1.305

A day known as Emancipation Day or Freedom Day, Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865 when Union troops brought news of emancipation to Texas, ending slavery in the US. As a historic site that bears the scars of slavery, Tudor Place also remembers the enslaved people who resisted bondage in ways large and small.  John Luckett, the Tudor Place gardener for 44 years, shared his self-emancipation story with his employer, Armistead Peter Jr.:

“I was a slave…at Lewinsville, Va. That evening, a bunch of Yankees came along…The following morning, I was ordered to drive a pair of mules that were hitched to an army wagon. In the afternoon, we could hear the booming of the guns at Bull Run…Three of us deserted. We traveled at night and hid in the day-time, for we had no passes to be on the road. One night, when we were near Lewinsville, a bunch of Yankees picked us up and took us to headquarters…Fortunately, they let us go…I just kept on…” 

Click here to learn about John Luckett and others who worked at Tudor Place.

Click here to learn about slavery at Tudor Place.

Click here to learn more about emancipation in the District of Columbia.

For questions or more information, please contact us at education@tudoplace.org.

Jockeying for Position: Horseracing among the Early Washington Elite

 

 

The elite of early Washington talked politics at the Jockey Club and horses in the U.S. Senate Chamber. The most famous horses in American history, like Secretariat and Man o’ War, are tied to some of the most famous men in American history.  Join Tudor Place Curator Rob DeHart and Dr. Lindsey Apple, historian and member of the Advisory Board of Ashland, The Henry Clay Estate in this dynamic discussion about the early DC horse racing industry and correspondence between Tudor Place’s Thomas Peter and Secretary of State Henry Clay of Kentucky about the sale of a prized racehorse.  Learn how Henry Clay, Thomas Peter and their contemporaries like Andrew Jackson and Martin Van Buren jockeyed for position — mixing politics, business and pleasure.

Photo collage: Ephemera, Tudor Place Archive; The Farmer of Ashland engraving of Henry Clay, Henry Clay Memorial Foundation.

Click to watch video.

Beautifying Every Corner: The Georgetown Garden Club

The Georgetown Garden Club helped rehabilitate the Box Knot at Tudor Place.

At the 2021 Garden Party on September 22,* Tudor Place will honor the Georgetown Garden Club for nearly a century of service to the community and decades of support for garden projects at Tudor Place. The relationship between the two organizations runs deep, going back to the earliest days of the Garden Club.

Click here to read the full article from the Tudor Place Times. 

 

* The 29th Annual Garden Party will be held September 22, 2021 and honor the Georgetown Garden Club. Additional gala details can be found here. The 28th Annual Spring Garden Party on May 20, 2020 was canceled.

Take a Virtual Tour of Tudor Place

Enjoy a virtual visit to Tudor Place.

The words of past owners Britannia Wellington Peter Kennon and Armistead Peter 3rd will guide you on an inspiring video tour of Tudor Place Historic House & Garden.

Happy Holidays from Tudor Place 2020

Here at Tudor Place we had prepared an illuminated garden for you this December. But given the recent rise in Covid-19 cases in our region, and our deep concern for the health and safety of our visitors and staff, the outdoor “Merry & Bright: Tudor Place Garden at Night” event was canceled. We wish you Happy Holidays and look forward to seeing you next year.

Standing in Solidarity: A Message from Mark Hudson, Executive Director

Events of the past week serve as painful reminders of our nation’s legacy of racism and the struggles that remain with us today. As an historic site that bears the scars of slavery, Tudor Place seeks to look this injustice in the eye. In acknowledging this part of our story, we pursue a common understanding that may help our nation and our community transcend its troubled past.

We mourn for all those who have suffered at the violent hand of racism and stand with those whose voices cry out for justice, longing for the day when protests will no longer be needed.

-Mark S. Hudson
Executive Director

New Gifts: Keep Busy Boxes

New Gifts at Tudor Place: Keep Busy Boxes

Support Tudor Place when you purchase a limited edition Keep Busy Box. Each care package includes an exclusive selection of items from the Museum Shop.

Prices include tax and shipping.

 

The Local Enthusiast $50

*Embassy Row Puzzle (100 pieces)
*Cherry notecards
*Homegrown Loofah from the Tudor Place Garden

 

The Tudor Place Fan $30

*Tudor Place Puzzle (54 pieces)
*Tudor Place Souvenir Book
*Blank notecard featuring Tudor Place South Façade
*Tudor Place Magnet

 

The Tea Lover $50

*Blackberry Tea Tin
*C.S. Lewis Mugmat
*Tudor Place Mug

 

The Book Lover $65

*Tudor Place Souvenir Book
*Literary Circles of Washington DC
*The Washingtons by Flora Fraser

 

The Garden Enthusiast $35

*Homegrown Black Eyed Susan and Cleome Seeds
*Harvest Log notepad
*Homegrown Loofah from the Tudor Place Garden

Taking Time to Notice

Tudor Place is launching a month-long initiative that will run from April 15 to May 15 as part of City Nature Month, Earth Day and National Public Gardens Week. Tudor Place will post activities and lessons, chat with students in their new home classrooms and share moments captured in the garden.

Look for updates from Tudor Place on the Education at Home portal and on social media.

April 22, 2020 marks the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, a unifying movement of parents, students, scientists and concerned citizens that began when Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson called on Americans to care for both the natural world and their neighbors.

In 2020, naturalists and horticulture hobbyists provide sound advice: go outside and look.

Notice the details and changes in the natural world around. Even if that means just beyond the doorstep.

Tudor Place partners with iNaturalist, City Nature Challenge and the American Public Gardens Association. Each organization embraces the healing power of nature. iNaturalist is a platform that crowdsources professional plant identifications, using photos by everyday citizens to create a worldwide scientific catalog. City Nature Challenge encourages stewardship of the natural world in urban spaces. The American Public Gardens Association is committed to making gardens inclusive public spaces.

These organizations rely on professional knowledge and citizen science – they need everyday observers.

The request, in the end, is simple: sit back, take a moment, and notice.

COVID-19 Update

 

We consider the welfare and safety of our visitors, staff and volunteers to be our first priority. In response to concerns about the COVID-19 virus,

Tudor Place is closed through July 31.

Check our Education at Home portal for an array of activities, crafts and more updated weekly.

Mark recently participated in a panel discussion about the future of historic house museums in the wake of Covid-19. Organized by Dumbarton House, the panel included their Executive Director, Karen Daly, and Erin Carlson Mast, CEO of President’s Lincoln’s Cottage.

You are a vital part of keeping Tudor Place a site of discovery, curiosity and learning today and for generations to come. In times such as these, we are ever more grateful for our extended network of friends, family and supporters who continue to stand alongside us. Brighter days lie ahead.

Thank you for supporting Tudor Place.

Donate

 

2018 Tudor Place Annual Report