18th Century Double-Barreled Pistol Discovered During Dig on Historic Tudor Place Grounds

Press Contact:
Heather Bartlow, hbartlow@tudorplace.org
202.965.0400 ext. 104
Website: https://tudorplace.org/
Tudor Place Historic House and Garden
1644 31st Street NW
Washington, DC 2007

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 15, 2010

Washington, D.C. – March 15, 2010 — A late 18th to early 19th century brass flintlock pistol was discovered early in the day March 10, 2010 on land that was once part of the 8 acre Tudor Place estate. Landscapers working on the property directly north of the Tudor Place administration building uncovered the antique double-barreled pistol. The current property owner immediately called Executive Director Leslie Buhler about the discovery. The brass flintlock pistol appears to have been manufactured in Belgium probably dating to the late 18th or early 19th Century according to Phillip Schreier, Senior Curator of the National Firearms Museum. The wood handle has rotted over time but the brass is in good condition with beautiful roping and linear details and a distinct oval proof mark. This type of pistol was often used for personal protection and dueling during the late 1700’s as it had a short effective range. It was also common for a woman to own this weapon since it was small and easy to carry in a waist pouch.

Further archeology on the site on March 11 revealed what appears to be an ash pit, both hand and machine made bricks, and an iron hinge complete with screws and wood fragments. Additionally a square block of schist was discovered that could potentially be a foundation pier for a structure!

These discoveries are extremely exciting and significant. The Tudor Place estate was originally the entire city block from Q to R streets and 31st to 32nd Streets. The northern portions of the land were sold after the Civil War, and despite all that is known about the site, there are still many unanswered questions. “We have yet to establish the location of slave quarters and service buildings vital to the function of an early Georgetown estate. Historical documentation has not yet revealed information about these features and archeology may be our only method for discovering this potentially enriching aspect of the site’s history.” says Executive Director Leslie Buhler.

Located in Georgetown’s Historic District, this National Historic Landmark is a house museum distinguished for its neoclassical architecture, decorative arts collection, and five-and-a-half acre garden. Built in 1816, it was home to Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington. It housed six generations of the Peter family over the course of 180 years. Now, open to the public, the historic home is one of our nation’s hidden gems. For details visit https://tudorplace.org/

TUDOR PLACE RECEIVES SPECIAL ZONING EXCEPTION TO OPERATE AS A MUSEUM IN A RESIDENTIAL AREA

Press Contact:
Heather Bartlow, hbartlow@tudorplace.org
202.965.0400 ext. 104
Website: www.tudorplace.org
Tudor Place Historic House and Garden
1644 31st Street NW
Washington, DC 2007

Download the PDF

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 12, 2009

Washington, DC – November 12, 2009 — Tudor Place Historic House and Garden received a special exception at a Board of Zoning Adjustments (BZA) hearing Tuesday morning to permanently operate as a museum in a residential neighborhood. Multiple unsolicited letters of approval from community members were sent to the BZA in support of Tudor Place’s 2009 application for permanent exception; however a preliminary hearing only granted Tudor Place an exception for 10 years. Executive Director, Leslie Buhler and Board Member/Strategic Planning Committee Chair Geoffrey Baker among other supporters, were not satisfied and appealed to the BZA for the full permanent exception.

Tudor Place is one of the only museums located in a DC residential area that has had to operate with this limited exception. Other museums such as Dumbarton House and the Textile Museum have operated in residential areas without restriction for years. In 2004, Tudor Place’s application for a permanent exception was met with widespread community disapproval. The hearing resulted in the requirement that Tudor Place re-apply for zoning permissions every 5 years. Now, five years later, Tudor Place has dramatically improved its standing in the community. Ms. Buhler notes, “Tudor Place takes great efforts to work with the community and to listen and respond positively to concerns.” The importance of a permanent exception to Tudor Place was stated by Mr. Baker, “Putting a time limit on the permission to use the property as a museum ties Tudor Place’s hands and makes its future uncertain. It does not make sense for Tudor Place to invest the millions of dollars required for improvements without any assurance that it can continue to operate beyond ten years.”

Located in Georgetown’s Historic District, this National Historic Landmark is a house museum distinguished for its neoclassical architecture, decorative arts collection, and five-and-a-half acre garden. Built in 1816, it was home to Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington. It housed six generations of the Peter family over the course of 180 years. Now, open to the public, the historic home is one of our nation’s hidden gems. For details visit www.tudorplace.org

TUDOR PLACE SURPASSES $3.5 MILLION GOAL TO COMPLETE ITS FIRST EVER CAPITAL CAMPAIGN

Press Contact:
Heather Bartlow, hbartlow@tudorplace.org
202.965.0400 ext. 104
Website: www.tudorplace.org
Tudor Place Historic House and Garden
1644 31st Street NW
Washington, DC 2007

Download the PDF

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 13, 2009

Washington, D.C. – October 13, 2009 — Tudor Place Historic House and Garden has successfully surpassed its first-ever capital campaign goal of $3.5 million to restore the National Historic Landmark house. While the painstaking restoration work continues, the funds are secured to protect this significant architectural statement of the early years of the American Republic. A cocktail party and award ceremony to thank donors to the campaign will be held on Wednesday, October 14, 2009 from 6-8 pm. Executive Director Leslie Buhler remarks, “The importance of this site is recognized by the support of the community for this restoration campaign. We are grateful that so many generously stepped forward during these turbulent economic times.”

Following substantial research, the multi-year conservation project to restore the city’s most architecturally significant 19th century residence began in 2006 with the replacement of 1914 drain lines surrounding the house. Last spring, the replacement of the cracked and crumbling stucco walls, restoration of the aging roof, and installation of a lightning protection system was undertaken. The final phase of the project involves coating the stucco walls, upgrading the mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and security systems, as well as the installation of fire detection and suppression systems.

Tudor Place Historic House and Garden is one of the city’s first National Historic Landmarks. “Of all the historic sites in Washington, nothing captures the ongoing life of the city better than Tudor Place. From the time of George Washington and Pierre L’Enfant to the opening years of the twenty first century, Tudor has quietly reflected the history of our nation’s capital.” remarks Austin H. Kiplinger, Kiplinger Washington Editors.

Benjamin Forgey, Architecture Critic for The Washington Post agrees, “Elegant in proportion, human in scale, fortunate in setting, Tudor Place is one of the more graceful monuments of Washington’s history.”

Completed in 1816, Tudor Place was the home of Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington. Located in Georgetown’s Historic District, Tudor Place is an historic site distinguished for its neoclassical architecture, decorative arts collection, and 5 ½ acres of garden.

Located in Georgetown’s Historic District, this National Historic Landmark is a house museum distinguished for its neoclassical architecture, decorative arts collection, and five-and-a-half acre garden. Built in 1816, it was home to Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington. It housed six generations of the Peter family over the course of 180 years. Now, open to the public, the historic home is one of our nation’s hidden gems. For details visit www.tudorplace.org

STODDERT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL & TUDOR PLACE HISTORIC HOUSE AND GARDEN COLLABORATE TO PRESENT CIVIL WAR STORIES

Press Contact:
Heather Bartlow, hbartlow@tudorplace.org
202.965.0400 ext. 104
Website: www.tudorplace.org
Tudor Place Historic House and Garden
1644 31st Street NW
Washington, DC 2007

Download the PDF

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 4, 2009

Washington, D.C. – May 4, 2009 — Stoddert Elementary School’s 5th grade class, in partnership with Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, will be performing Civil War Stories a series of Civil War themed plays written by the students and performed on the historic grounds of Tudor Place on Thursday, May 21 at 6:00 p.m. (Rain date: Wednesday, May 27)

Civil War Stories is the culmination of an innovative year-long school program entitled Hand in Hand: History, Writing, Math and Science at Tudor Place. Stoddert students participated in eight field trips and in-class presentations by museum educators or performing artists to gain a better understanding of Washington DC’s unique local history. The program concludes with student performances of Civil War Stories against the historic backdrop of Tudor Place’s Temple Portico on May 21.

Throughout the year, students took part in several activities to actually experience the life of in the 1860’s including dressing in period clothing, learning proper etiquette and manners, singing songs from the period and learning traditional dances. Students also became history detectives as they investigated artifacts, documents, paintings, and photographs to learn about the Civil War and its impact on the city of Washington. Students then used their newly acquired knowledge from primary sources in a series of play-writing workshops led by the Education Staff at Tudor Place, to develop short plays based on historical fact. “The writing process has been fantastic!” says Stoddert teacher Steve Dingledine.

The Hand in Hand program was piloted in September 2008 and was designed to build a close working relationship with Tudor Place and Stoddert Elementary School to enable students to utilize the wide variety of historic and natural resources available at Tudor Place.

Located in Georgetown’s Historic District, this National Historic Landmark is a house museum distinguished for its neoclassical architecture, decorative arts collection, and five-and-a-half acre garden. Built in 1816, it was home to Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington. It housed six generations of the Peter family over the course of 180 years. Now, open to the public, the historic home is one of our nation’s hidden gems. For details visit www.tudorplace.org

TUDOR PLACE INTRODUCES “TUDOR NIGHTS”

Press Contact:
Heather Bartlow, hbartlow@tudorplace.org
202.965.0400 ext. 104
Website: www.tudorplace.org
Tudor Place Historic House and Garden
1644 31st Street NW
Washington, DC 2007

Download the PDF

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 17, 2009

Washington, D.C. – March 17, 2009 — Tudor Place announces the
launch of a new series of cocktail evenings for young professionals and
members of the historic house. Attendees enjoy drinks inspired by the
history of Tudor Place, light refreshments, and an up close look at a
correlating historic object from the Tudor Place collection. These
engaging events provide opportunities for professionals to establish and
expand personal and business relationships in the community, while
pursuing a deeper appreciation of art, history, preservation and culture.
Each event will be held on a Thursday, and will be open from 6:00 p.m.
to 8:00 p.m. Members of Tudor Place are invited to attend free of
charge. Nonmembers are welcome at $10 per person. Ages 21 and
over.

Wine with Washington

Thursday, March 26
6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Tudor Nights kicks off with fine wines and George Washington’s wine cooler.
Sample different wine blends that Washington would have enjoyed, as well as
local blends from his home state of Virginia. The highlighted object will be the
wine cooler used by George and Martha Washington at Mount Vernon.
Music by Robert Hanson www.RobertHansonGuitar.com.

Upcoming:

June 4: Cocktails in the Garden
*Featured object: Tudor Place Flower Knot

September 17: Toddies at Tudor Place
*Featured object: Washington Punch Bowl

November 19: The Art of the Martini
*Featured object: Antique Martini Set

Located in Georgetown’s Historic District, this National Historic Landmark is a house museum distinguished for its neoclassical architecture, decorative arts collection, and five-and-a-half acre garden. Built in 1816, it was home to Thomas Peter and his wife, Martha Custis Peter, granddaughter of Martha Washington. It housed six generations of the Peter family over the course of 180 years. Now, open to the public, the historic home is one of our nation’s hidden gems. For details visit www.tudorplace.org

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Washington Post KidsPost · National House of History